Friday, 10 September 2010

A Weekend in the Garden


My plan for the weekend involves gardening gloves, weed removal, mulching and preparing my old garden beds for some new plants. I have been obsessing over these gorgeous plants in the image above and as I am completely not-in-the-know when it comes to gardens I wondered whether anybody could tell me what these are? I just love them. Would they live in our hot climate here in Brisbane?

xx
Anna

75 comments:

flowerpress said...

Aren't they beautiful. They're Echiums and the bees love them. I'm pretty sure they'd grow in Brisbane though they do like the dry.
Google Frogmores Gardens for lots of beautiful perennials by mail order ;-)

pve design said...

I think those are "blue delphiniums" or perhaps "foxgloves" and your local nursery or garden shop should be able to help you out and tell you if they would work in your zone.
Yesterday, went on a garden tour at "The Cloisters" and learned so much!
Have fun in the garden and show us your artistry!
pve

ampersand-design.blogspot.com said...

Looks like a Lupin to me. As far as I'm aware they prefer a temperate climate, but I'd still give it a go in Brissie anyhow.

Sandy K

Jennifer, Inside Out Colour and Design said...

We have them in our garden in Sydney. They are Echium Candicans or Pride of Madiera. I just googled them and it looks like they are hardy, drought resistant and ideal of coastal climates. Sounds like they'd be perfect for Brissie. Enjoy your therapy in the garden.

Jennifer XX

Minnie said...

They are an Echium species. There are quite a few to chose from and a range of colours from bright blue through to purples and pinks. Very hardy- thrive on neglect but like a bit of a drink. I love them too. They give a garden some really good architectural form when they are in flower.

Betsy B said...

It is an echium. I think it is suitable for warm, dry climates. If you contact digger's (www.diggers.com.au) they should be able to tell you and can probably have a couple of different versions they could send to you.
I love them too - have been trying to grow one in our front garden but the neighbours dog keeps weeing on it!

Rose Harvest said...

The gorgeous plants pictured on your page are "Echiums" ECHIUM is really easy to grow if it will get at least 6 hours of sun per day, and some space to breathe, as they are susceptible to fungus if too crowded in the garden and kept too moist. They grow to at least one metre in height and are a perennial which means they die down in Winter and re-grow each Spring. Perfect for your climate :)

Rose Harvest said...

The gorgeous plants pictured on your page are ECHIUM. They grow to about one metre in height and being perennial,die off each Winter and re-grow in the Spring. They need at least 6 hours of sunlight per day and lots of space, as they are susceptible to fungus and rot if planted in a spot that is too damp or crowded. Perfect for your climate!

ALACATI said...

Hello,
These are gorgeous plants, I like it..I have no idea about these plants, but I just can say; just do it!..All thinks grow with Love...
Have a lovely weekend!

rebecca geldard said...

they look like cat's tails. 'Veronica Spicata Blue (Cat’s tails) Perennial'or possibly 'Darwin Blue' or 'Royal Candles'

regards - rebecca geldard (also from brisbane). if they you can get them to grow well, let me know as i might plant them as well.

Karen said...

Hi Anna
I'm pretty sure that plant is pride of madeira
Kind regards
Karen

Pieter said...

Hi Anna,

I think it's Agastache foeniculum (blue giant hyssop). It's part of the mint family...

Hope it helps :)

Erin said...

They look like lupines to me, but I am not sure.

Fine and Dandy Vintage Living said...

I think those are Lupine. You would LOVE them...but I don't think they would grow there. They are in Northern US I know...and I've seen fields of pinks and purples and whites, amazing..but google images did turn this photo up from New Zealand...so maybe! http://www.hickerphoto.com/lupine-plant-15939-pictures.htm

mydesignchic said...

They are beautiful...wish I knew. Happy weeding!

Vintage Home said...

..not sure but looks like Lupins...beautiful...they grow wild here near the freeways....but I have found in my garden they are kinda buggy...we try not to use sprays...but possibly in Australia they would do better...they come in PINK too

Mary said...

They look like lupins. In Canada they appear in the spring (they grow wild on the east coast) and come in a multitude of colours.

Tricia Rose said...

Anna they are lupins, and grow wild in abundance in San Francisco Bay - especially at Larkspur, so-named by a lady who mistook them!

We have hot dry summers, mild wet winters, so I'm sure they could cope n Brisbane.

sixty-five said...

They look like lupines, which are not fond of hot weather. Maybe take the photo to a top notch garden center and ask about similar plants that might do well?

Janell @ Isabella and Max said...

I know virtually nothing about plants, but these look gorgeous, whatever they are! Enjoy your gardening! Janell

estee said...

Hi Anna,

This plant is the Pride of Madeira, Echium Fastuosum, My granny used to grow them here in Cape Town. They like poor soil, good drainage and lots of sun.

Thank you for your wonderful blog, it inspires me on a daiy bases.

Good luck with your garden.
Estee

estee said...

Hi Anna,

This plant is the Pride of Madeira, Echium Fastuosum, My granny used to grow them here in Cape Town. They like poor soil, good drainage and lots of sun.

Thank you for your wonderful blog, it inspires me on a daiy bases.

Good luck with your garden.
Estee

Shirley Crowley said...

those plants are called "Pride of Madeira." there's a ton of them that grow out in south san francisco, california. they seem like a very hardy, low-maintenance plant and they bloom for over half the year. i love them.

Briana M. Corr Scott said...

They look like lupines to me...but I am only guessing. It is wet and foggy and cold here, so I bet they would grow anywhere. I am no green thumb though--double check!

Living near the sea said...

Anna, I love these, but can't remember their name. I grew them once but mine didn't stand so straight .. they were inclined to topple over and get rather untidy. I'm away from home and my garden books for a couple of weeks. Someone will know, if not, I'll get back to you

whitney-anne said...

I believe these are Echiums . . no idea what kind of conditions they need but any good nursery should be able to tell you. Failing that Google it!!

P said...

Pride of Madeira (Echium candicans)
It can get huge! http://www.sunset.com/garden/flowers-plants/nine-seaside-stars-00400000011902/
It grows along the freeway just off the Pacific Ocean near Santa Barbara/Ventura
Might you trade some info? What was that gorgeous chair fabric featured in your November 20, 2008 post? You can tell I'm obsessed!

Living near the sea said...

I think this might be it .. PRIDE OF MADEIRA
Echium candicans (syn. fastuosum)Thank you Google

freefalling said...

They are Echiums!
And they are glorious!
I have one in my garden, but I live in Victoria,
but....
Apparently, they are grown at Mt Cootha.

And here is a thread you might find interesting:
where to buy etc.
http://www.au.gardenweb.com/forums/load/peren/msg111832252419.html

kholden said...

What you have, Anna, are Lupines, my favorite flower. They are a member of the pea family and are considered hardy in New England. They were imported originally from England, where they are known as Russell Lupines. They should be planted in the early spring, which must be just about now for you. They like sun or partial shade and a moist soil, however anyone who has travelled along the highways of Maine in June has seen them growing wild by the millions,so if your climate is compatible with that along the seacoast of Maine, give it a try. They come in luxurious shades of pink, yellow, white, blue and purple and have long, finger-like grayish or bright green leaves. I haven't had much luck carrying them over from year to year at our house in the foothills of the Berkshires, but I think we usually get too cold in the winter. Good luck! They're worth the effort! See the children's book by Barbara Cooney called "Miss Rumphius."

Lyn said...

Hi Anna,
These are Echium plants. I recently posted on my garden challenge and featured these! I live in Tassie and they thrive on neglect. My patch was bare crappy clay soil and in about 9 months the entire bank was filled. They are evergreen and stay nice looking all year round even when not in bloom. Good luck xx
Lyn (LINI Home)

Herta said...

Hello Anna,

the plant you have posted is an echium, they grow quite large are very drought tolerant. You can grow from seed or buy a potted plant. I'm from Melbourne and they grow well here and considering they originate in the carnay islands they shouldbe fine in Brisbane but I'm sure your local plant nursery could help...I know in Melbourne they have become very popular over the years. There are different varieties so if you are after the brightest blue then E. candicans or 'pride of madeira is the go.
Good luck, Herta

So Lovely said...

Are they Pride Of Madeira - here's a closeup photo of them.
http://www.sunset.com/garden/flowers-plants/nine-seaside-stars-00400000011902/

Herta said...

Follow up...garden express currently have plants for sale...

http://www.gardenexpress.com.au/search.php?mode=search&page=1

Look forward to future postings of your new garden!

Herta

maria marks said...

I believe them to be echinops... they do well in calif. but I don't know about your climate.

Lee Nicholson said...

I LOVE them too. They are "Pride of Madeira" and they do quite well in Los Angeles so would see to be ok for Brisbane.

Pamela said...

It is an Echium and they like hot, dry climates. There are several growing around here in the Blue Mountains of NSW (where it is anything but hot and dry), but the soil here is sandy which they seem to like. There are different types, some not near as large as the one in your picture and some can flower year after year.
Happy Gardening, Pamela

greenwords said...

Echium - so gorgeous! Will be interested to hear if anyone has grown them in SEQ, I suspect it's humidity more than heat that's a potential problem.

chick in a ute said...

Hi Anna,
They're echiums...not 100% sure which type but probably the one known as "pride of madeira". There are lots of different types, ranging in colour from pale pinks and mauve to brighter blues. Gorgeous! Not sure how they'd go up in Brisbane, but they're very tough, I think from the mediterranean region originally.
Hope this helps!
Anthea

Wendy said...

These plants grow wild in my yard in Mill Valley, California. I had no idea what they were called, but went on a hunt and learned that they are "Echium candicans" or "Pride of Madeira". We don't have rain all summer here -- so they do well in a dry climate -- although we are near the coast and do get fog. Hope this helps!! :-)

Wendy said...

These plants grow wild in my yard in Mill Valley, California. I didn't know what they were called but went on a hunt and learned that they are "Echium candicans" or "Pride of Madeira". We don't have rain all summer so they do well in a warm, dry climate (although we are near the coast and do get fog). I hope this helps!! :-)

gdaybeautiful said...

I love these, echiums. I just bought one at the nursery this morning so fingers crossed it does well. I'm in Hervey Bay so not too different to Brisbane.

Kelly Green said...

Anna, these are echium and seem to be very drought tolerant and easy to grow. i have them in my garden and they look fabuous in full bloom. Good luck!KG

nkkki said...

Hi Anna plant in photo is "pride of maderia" flowers in summer dies back in winter so prune it back then. It comes in grande (shown in photo) or piccolo. Loves sun so I would assume would love Brisbane. Nikki

KimC said...

This statley flower is an Echium. They are usually purple, but if you check out www.diggers.com.au they have white, pink and port wine. They like full sun and good drainage.

Judy B-M said...

Anna, the plant is Echium Candicans (Pride of Madeira).Just gorgeous. It is very hardy, thriving in hot, dry conditions. Avoid constant moisture. Loves to be pruned after flowering. I have one on Mt Tamborine. The plant will do well in Brisbane. Happy gardening!

We are The Bellinghams said...

Hi Anna,
They are called 'Echium'. I don't know how they are would be in QLD but they are very hardy and drought tolerant here in Vic. You can purchase them through a site like the 'Digger's Club' which probably has the info you want. You can get them in purple, blue or pink. Yes they are stunning! Happy gardening

Matt said...

Hi Anna
The lovely shrub is echium fastuosum
Enjoy
Catherine

GloucesterMary said...

The flowers look a bit like Lupine to me but not the leaves?! Lupine blooms here in New England towards mid- to end May. The purple Lupine roadside in Maine is spectacular! But it's also lovely in a garden. We have white, purple and a lovely rose-colored Lupine in our perennial beds!

CJ said...

Hi Anna,

I used to have them here in my garden in Melbourne. They start with E - Echium, Ellium or something like that? Very hardy and they thrived on no attention. Pretty sure they handle any climate, but I am no expert. I took them out in the end as they grew like crazy and I ran out of room for them. Sorry I can't offer more detailed help!
CJ

FairyFiligree said...

Hi, these are found in gardens in the island in the Med where I live. They apparently thrive on Mediterranean style climate. It could be a Buddleia Davidii which comes in different colours and flowers between July & September.

Marianne said...

Hi Anna,

Love your blog. I am an American who lives in Sydney.
I think the plant in the photo is echium. However, wiki says:
One species, Echium plantagineum (Patterson's Curse), has become a major invasive species in Australia.
I have seen it in the UK and San Francisco. You could search for echium substitute on the web. Someone up the street from me grows artichokes until they flower. Very pretty too.

The Clip Cafe said...

Are they some type of lavender? They are pretty whatever they are :-)

Dolo said...

I´m not the most gardenistic person although I love it, but aren´t those lavenders?

Louise Wakefield said...

Hi Anna,

Left my comment on the wrong date, "echium", not sure how it grows in Qld, does beaut in Vic. Enjoy your new garden. Thanks for your lovely blog, Lou

Zoƫ Yule said...

That there is an Echium, though no knowing which of the many species. Patterson's curse (an invasive weed in Oz) is an echium too, so there are definitely species for most climates! That said, I've tried several of the ornamental varieties in Brisbane with zero success. They grew well but completely failed to flower. I found they were only available from mail-order nurseries, most of which are based in Southern NSW or Victoria, so maybe it's just that the right varieties aren't available in Brisbane. They may also dislike hot wet summers, as most growing notes suggest hot dry summers (mediterranean climates) are suitable. I hope you have better luck! Oh, and you need a LOT of space - they get very big very quickly!

Coco Coterie said...

I have no idea what those pretty lavender flowers are, but your weekend in the garden sounds lovley. xox Alexandra

houseenvy said...

They look like muscari to me - there's a huge bank of images of them if you google. Not sure whether they'd survive your climate as I'm in the UK, where excessive sun is not an issue... Love your blog btw - have been lurking for a few weeks.

Tricia Rose said...

Lupins!

pamela said...

I don't know the name of them but their native to Southern California. You might do some digging around the gardening websites in California and see if they pop up. They are very popular in Santa Barbara and Montecito gardens. They would probably love your climate but they do get big!

Good luck,

Pamela in Portland, OR (formerly of California)

Karen said...

Anna,they are called Pride of Madeira and they do very well in So. California,as well as San Francisco and inland,where it gets very hot!

Melinda said...

I think they might be a variety of lupin... Not sure about the suitability to Brisbane, but your local nursery could probable tell you.

Yasmine Abigail said...

i had an ugly one of these , was just in the wrong place i didnt know what it was either but did fine in our adelaide climate im sure it would be great in brissy just make sure it has lots of space

k.springhall said...

They are Echiums, and look like the giant variety. They are tricky to grow in Queensland.
I have successfully grown small seedlings from seed purchased from the heritage garden at Heronswood, the Digger's Club HQ near Melbourne, but they never flowered and foliage never grew much more than the size of dinner plate. (but it may have just been me!)

Sam said...

Hi Anna,

they're echiums. They'll grow well in Brisbane. I've grown them in just as hot a climate. The flowers are as lovely as the photo shows, and they're pretty low maintenance too!

Ness Lockyer said...

Pride Of Madieria I think is the correct name. We have them growing wild here in Tassie along our main roads and they are lovely and grow without any care at all...hence the main road neglect ;0)
Ness xx

iackermann said...

Etchium fastuosum

sharon said...

What a great picture! No wonder you want these in your garden. I don't recognise this plant but the stalk shape and leaf look like a euphorbia.
Sharon
My French Country Home

Tash said...

Anna,

I'm not 100% sure but I think the plant is a type of Eucomis. I'm sure you can grow the most fabulous plants in Brisi, all that sunshine and plenty of tropical showers to keep the ground fertile.
You can always search for plants on the RHS plant selector, and chose a H1 or H2 hardiness

http://apps.rhs.org.uk/rhsplantselector/default.aspx

I was also wondering if you'd had your baby yet, I'm sure you must have by now.
best wishes
Tash

Kim said...

Hi Anna

They are called Echiums and they will grow in Brisbane. Have a look in some local nurseries and they might have a variety that is well suited to your climate.

They are stunning when all in bloom.

Kim

Anna Spiro said...

You guys are AMAZING! Thank you so much for all your amazing comments and links. I'm so excited that Echium will live here in my garden in Brisbane!!

xo
Anna

Debra said...

We have LOTS of these plants in Santa Barbara, California, and they are indeed lovely. They attract a lot of bees though, so you may want to keep that in mind if you decide to plant them. You might not want them too close to the house or where people will be congregating. Love your blog BTW.

Faux Fuchsia said...

Ok I don't want to rain on your parade but these are hard to source round these here parts- you'll have to get on line (maybe Diggers) and they LOATHE humidity. It's like lavender- We can grow it round here, but not like it grows where there is no humidity. You'll have to fight rot and fungal infections. But I say, give it a red hot go. I know you love purple- get on board with salvias and cosmos and Sidonie lavender and agapanthus. xx

demotutorial said...

Beautiful lavender-colored flowers. And yeah, it looks like bees would love them.
Landscape Orange County

rebecca geldard said...

Hi Anna. Was in Toowoomba for the weekend and saw them in a few gardens. They obviously like the climate there.